1001 Water-and-waste-wise ways: Different city, same plastic
One hundred reusable pads headed off to a clinic in the Eastern Cape: the cores stuffed with waste fabric. Because this blog needs to start with something hopeful.

One hundred reusable pads headed off to a clinic in the Eastern Cape: the cores stuffed with waste fabric. Because this blog needs to start with something hopeful.

Last weekend I had the pleasure of taking part in the beautifully oiled machine that is the Kingsmead Book Fair – kudos to the organisers, and thanks to my fellow authors: it’s such fun hanging around other folk with a yen for inventing imaginary people and worlds.

But the trip itself took me right back to the impulse that started the waste book: plastic plastic everywhere – and all in the name of convenience. Airports, hotels, chain restaurants are one huge horrifying sea of single-use plastic. This while seeing the same old bleat on social media: that instead of shaming the huge corporations who generate tons of branded rubbish, the onus is on us not to litter. Sure, but dropping our Big Mac wrappings or Coke bottle or plastic cutlery into a bin simply moves that garbage a few metres to the left or right. It doesn’t address the problem of generating that waste in the first place, or the energy and planetary costs of disposing of it. According to National Geographic, HALF of the world’s plastic has been manufactured since 2000. That’s in our children’s lifetimes. We need to send loud and clear messages to manufacturers: enough is enough.

Anyway, I was so shaken by the profligate appearance of plastic on my weekend of travel, I carted most of it home with me, not trusting the good people of Jozi to recycle it. Then I realised it was ridiculous for me to angst about plastic jam tubs when I had FLOWN up to Johannesburg in the first place. Sigh. But this is no excuse NOT to sweat the small stuff

Here’s some of that small stuff: the vanity kit in my hotel bathroom. Note the “greenwashed” box, with the magic “eco” word. But what’s the point when the two earbuds (plastic) and single cotton pad it contains are wrapped in extra plastic? And what earthly reason is there for the emery board to have its own plastic jacket? No man, this nonsense has got to stop.

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And now (brace yourself for slappable virtue-signalling), pics of the garbage I’ve generated this year (1 Jan to 31 May). Those two plastic bags: all I’m sending to landfill so far in 2019. Their contents consist almost entirely of the polystyrene trays and cling-wrap in which the raw chicken for my cats is packaged. (And there’s a solution in sight, as I’ve found a free-range chicken outlet in Tokai – just need to check whether they’ll let me bring in my own containers.) So yay for me, right?

In five months, two bags of unrecyclable waste (irony: spot the recycling sign on the polystyrene tray that held raw meat…)

In five months, two bags of unrecyclable waste (irony: spot the recycling sign on the polystyrene tray that held raw meat…)

NO. I compost, I recycle all my glass, metal and paper, I burn food-stained paper and used cotton-wool, but LOOK at the bag of plastic I collected for recycling over the same five-month period! HORRORS. And that’s trying as hard as possible to not to buy stuff packaged in plastic. Plus it doesn’t include the six eco-bricks I’ve filled this year with little bits of single-use plastic (those jam tublets and what-not).

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So if for all my draconian waste-free and anti-plastic measures, I’ve generated a sack of plastic nearly as tall as myself in five months, what kind of plastic waste is the average middle-class household producing? We’re pretty much forced to be complicit as the consumer industry shoves the stuff down our throats. So we need to keep pressuring our food supply sources (Woolworths, I am SO side-eyeing you) to rethink their plastic use. I’ve pointed out before that plastic can be hugely valuable: for preserving food and thus preventing waste, for enabling people who do not own cars to schlep their shopping home without dislocating their shoulders, for products like medical supplies. But there is way too much of it, and now there is this thing of double bagging, Russian-doll-style: where vitamins are packaged both in a jar AND a box, where chicken pieces (and many other goods, including, unforgivably, espresso pods) are individually wrapped in plastic when the entire item is ALREADY packaged in plastic.

Yes, my sack of plastic will go for recycling. And thanks to the informal sector, South Africa is not too bad at this. But much of the plastic we “recycle” actually makes an expensive, planet-mucking trip across the globe to the landfills of South-East Asia, where it piles up in tons, or is burned in toxic polluting pyres that make local people ill. In 2018, China stopped accepting plastic waste, and now Malaysia and the Phillipines are following suit, tired of being dumping-grounds for the waste of the West on top of their own.

Are there solutions? I like the Swiss one, which legislates that every single district/canton is responsible for disposing of its own waste – they may not be ship it off elsewhere. Citizens are welcome to take their rubbish to their local dump – at a cost of about three US dollars per bag. I loved this about my brief time living in Maine: the only way to dispose of waste was to buy (fairly small) garbage bags from the town hall for a dollar each, fill them and take them to the dump. However, we could unload anything recyclable for free. And I remember the recycling centre in Massachusetts (SA journalist Charlene Smith took me to visit): a magical place where everything imaginable could be dropped off and picked up (it had a library, a barn full of furniture, racks of clothing and a toy “shop”). After winding our way through all the different spots allotted to tin, glass, engine oil, lawn clippings, e-waste and much more, we finally handed our (by now tiny) packet of genuine garbage to a worker who interrogated us as to its contents: we were SURE nothing in there was recyclable?

So it’s time to start leaning on big businesses and small municipalities: create less waste at one end, and provide smart, sensible recycling options (with much-needed incoming-generating possibilities) at the other end.

My visit to Gauteng, a water-stressed region, also made me wonder when “acting like a Capetonian” is going to catch on country-wide, especially given that the Eastern Cape is in almost as pitiful a state of drought as Cape Town was a year ago, and water in many major rural centres is either undrinkable or scarce.(Phuthaditjhaba, for one, and don’t even start me on the mismanaged train-wreck that is Makhanda/Grahamstown.) A friend who regularly travels for work arrived at her guesthouse and asked for a bucket for catching her shower water. “We got another one from Cape Town here!” called the receptionist. (I disassembled the waste basket in my hotel room to create a flushing bucket: worked perfectly.) I’ve also noticed that when in other cities, we tend to emerge from the loo to announce, with degrees of defiance, “I’m from Cape Town, so I didn’t flush.” It’s funny, but not funny: we all need to start acting like this.

Thirty packs of pads for new mothers at Mowbray Maternity Home: keeping disposable pads out of landfill.

Thirty packs of pads for new mothers at Mowbray Maternity Home: keeping disposable pads out of landfill.

Is there good news? Yes! Look at these pics of the reusable, washable menstrual and maternity pads a bunch of women in my neighbourhood, led by writer Helen Brain, created — stuffed with beat-up fabric that would otherwise go into landfill. Plus each of those pads is going to keep multiple disposable pads out of those same landfills. The lessons here are obvious — also heartwarming.

PS: My next book — 101 Waste-wise Ways — is finished! Hurrah! I just need to respond to the really useful edits I got, most especially from the ever-reliable Paige Nick. And then it will hop into production and be on its way to a bookshelf near you.

Helen Moffett
The silver lining of the apocalypse
Recycling fabric into reusable maternity pads. *All pics taken and posted with permission*

Recycling fabric into reusable maternity pads. *All pics taken and posted with permission*

I haven’t written a waste blog for a while because I thought I’d finish my waste book first. I had a complete first draft ready for edits nearly a month ago, and then life got in the way. What’s amazing is that in the few weeks in which I was attending to various personal crises, public responses to the environmental crisis seem to have changed. There is a new sense of urgency, a recognition (as Mozambique is battered by unprecedented cyclones, African countries reel under successive droughts and floods, entire ice-shelves disappear overnight) that climate change/catastrophe isn’t in the near future: it’s already here. Photos not just of entire cities under water (Beira) but of luxury cars in sinkholes on the Durban coast indicate that even the rich are starting to feel the effects (which is sadly, what it takes to get some folk to sit up and pay attention).

Environmental reporting has moved front and centre, with a belated recognition that this IS urgent political and economic news, not a “nice-to-have” option. When I started this project, I bookmarked every link that might add a tip to my book: only a month ago, doing a couple of hours of research a day, I was collecting twenty reports a week. Now it’s twenty in that hour or two, and I could add dozens more.

The silver lining to the apocalypse is seeing how people are responding to what is the greatest threat to the entire planetary population and all its ecosystems and civilisations. And amid all the (appropriate) horror and despair is a great deal of kindness and grace. American philosopher Joanna Macy talks about how the current bleak position offers an opportunity to break “the isolation we have been conditioned to experience … especially by this hyper-individualist consumer society.”

I keep finding wonderful people doing extraordinary things. As we move to lifestyles where we’re making more conscious and creative choices about how we use the world’s resources, we’re finding that hanging around solution-oriented people is good not just for the planet, but for our souls.

This really struck me when, on a fabric and clothing recycling Facebook group, I stumbled across photos of tiny exquisite garments made by someone who recycles old donated wedding dresses into gowns and “pockets” (she doesn’t use the word “shroud”) for stillborn babies to be baptised, buried or cremated in. She does this for love. I tear up every time I think about this. This kind of project might have only the tiniest impact in terms of the planet, but as a form of repurposing that showcases the best in human nature, and our capacity for compassion and connection, it’s hard to beat.

Cape Town writer Helen Brain has started a project on similar principles, rounding up a team who make washable reusable maternity pads. She collects tatty old towels and T-shirts, flannel nighties and PJs past their sell-by date and uses them as filling. Obviously some of the fabric used is bought new, but as a double-impact form of waste-recycling, this is a personal favourite of mine. Both disposable pads AND clothing too beat-up to donate to charities are kept out of landfills, but the real value of the project might be the sense of connection between the women who gather to make the pads, and the women to whom they’re donated. Through the non-profit that does the distribution, we get feedback that enables us to tweak design and improve the pads, which saves us from being a bunch of middle-class do-goodie-gooders who give poor women what we think they need. The whole is truly greater than the sum of the parts: it would be very difficult to do this alone, but as a collective, it works beautifully.

Many hands making light work, but also lighter hearts.

Many hands making light work, but also lighter hearts.

This is perhaps the strangest thing about the coming apocalypse: that it creates these connections and synergies. I'm reminded of maybe the "best" thing about the water crisis -- the way it got Capetonians (infamous for insularity and worse) talking to those around us. Rebecca Solnit recently wrote a piece on how we’re smitten with stories of a single hero coming to save us — whereas the truth is that it’s the less glamorous communal efforts that repair the holes we tear in the fabric of existence: weaving, gathering, planting, making soup, knitting a blanket, attending a community meeting, cleaning up a park or river. Let’s get stuck in.

Not one scrap of fabric is wasted: the offcuts are all shovelled into these huge bean bags, which are then donated for use as furnishing.

Not one scrap of fabric is wasted: the offcuts are all shovelled into these huge bean bags, which are then donated for use as furnishing.

Helen Moffett
1001 Water-and waste-wise ways: What to do with deckchairs on the Titanic
Pic found on the interwebz, presumably a still from the film. No photographer attributed.

Pic found on the interwebz, presumably a still from the film. No photographer attributed.

I’ve been having some fascinating conversations with friends who are environmental activists, journalists and researchers, about the great conundrum that reading up on waste has faced me with: given the multitude of ways we’ve wrecked the planet almost past repair, is there any point in reducing waste? Why are we taking cloth bags to the shops when industries hellbent on profit are pouring CO2 into the air, polluting our oceans and water supplies, denuding soil, wiping out forests, and destroying the “lowly” members of the food chain (insects, amphibians, birds, fish) on which we’re absolutely reliant if we are to go on eating? Isn’t asking people to give up plastic toothbrushes a bit like rearranging the deckchairs on the Titanic? In fact, polishing the brass screws on those deckchairs?

If you do the reading, there’s no getting around the fact that environmental activism is urgently needed and must involve more than just recycling our glass and cans: it needs to get political. Like growing numbers of schoolchildren around the globe, we should be marching in the streets. The mantra “reduce, reuse, recycle, repurpose” is increasingly looking quaint and ineffective in comparison with “refuse, resist, revolt, rewild”. Scientists have explained with crystal clarity that it’s not individual efforts that are going to save the planet: for that, our craven governments have to call a halt to the plunder by big corporates that they and we have allowed; and we have to replace our lethal economic (“growth is the one true good, growth at any cost”) models.

So why bother? Leonie Joubert, the brilliant science writer I often cite, has pointed out that the only alternative to literally suicidal despair is to become solution-oriented (read her NB piece — it starts getting hopeful on p. 4). This has several benefits, and not just the obvious one — that concerted efforts by many individuals can have a significant impact, as we all learned during the water crisis. (Across the board, the residents of Cape Town reduced their water usage by a THIRD almost overnight.) Doing something, no matter how small, reduces our sense of anxiety, despair, helpless rage and grief. It models decent behaviour for our children (who are going to judge the hell out of us — in fact, they’re already doing so). To go back to the Titanic example: if the ship is going down anyway, it might not do any good rearranging the deckchairs, much less wiping specks of dust off them. But hastily roping them together to create extra life-rafts? Can’t hurt, might help, and will give passengers something proactive and constructive to do in the face of impending disaster. Even better if folk pull together as a team in the process.

So, here are a few small but useful tips. I’ve realised my big waste-wise Achilles heel is the vast range of cleaning products under my sink. Not just because they’re mostly unnecessary — many are in plastic or other containers that present a disposal problem. The entire lot can be replaced with bicarb and spirit vinegar.

My big blind spot. Apart from the vinegar and bicarb, I don’t need most of this stuff.

My big blind spot. Apart from the vinegar and bicarb, I don’t need most of this stuff.

I got this great idea for addressing the pungent odour of vinegar from the writer Christine Coates: buy 5-litre bottles, decant into smaller bottles, insert lavender stalks/flowers or citrus peel (I’m trying scented pelargoniums at the moment) and stand in the sun for a few days. The vinegar turns a pretty colour and smells delicious. Use it to clean showers, tiles, kitchen surfaces, glass, mirrors. If there’s crusted or baked-on dirt, sprinkle on bicarb as well and use a little elbow grease.

Last week, I spilled a tray of gravy and fat all over the oven, spattering the sides and creating an oily charcoal puddle on the bottom. I threw a cup of bicarb at the problem, followed it with a half a cup of hot water, then left it all to stand for 24 hours. Whereupon it all lifted off as smooth as silk, as I wiped first with paper towels, then reusable cloths — no scrubbing or rubbing needed. It’s the cleanest my oven has ever been.

I found this article, claiming that all household cleansers can be replaced with these two cheap, biodegradable options plus Castile soap, hard to believe at first, but so far my experiments show that specialist cleaning fluids (including the green products on which I’ve spent a fortune in my lifetime, and which still present containers in need of recycling) are yet another enormous marketing con. We truly don’t need them.

Next, my Quaker friend Sue Mottram has come up with a wonderful idea for Lent, for those who mark this time of the Christian year. Instead of giving up chocolate or coffee, put a household item or piece of clothing in a box for each of the forty days of Lent. Come Easter, donate this box to a charity or non-profit. Another idea: if living plastic-free is new to you, try giving up plastic, or at least single-use plastic, for Lent. Or start stuffing small bits of single-use plastic into 2-litre milk containers to create ecobricks (this great article will tell you all you need to know): this has the added benefit of compacting together lots of little bits of plastic that are particularly lethal to ocean fish and birds, and very hard to clean up once in our water systems.

I spotted a mostly North American Facebook group asking its members how far they were from their nearest zero-waste store. We should ask the same, especially if we have regular farmers’ markets within reach. Calculate whether you can make a trip to this shop or market part of your regular grocery run, and keep a box or basket in the boot of your car with jars, packets, bags and containers to use for your purchases.

This is also time to think collectively and act co-operatively: find your local waste-free shop and commit to it. I’m lucky to have the Low-Impact Living Cafe in neighbouring Glencairn, with its legendary coffee and homemade bread.

Reality Brown makes the best toasted sandwiches in the Peninsula (her picture taken and posted with permission).

Reality Brown makes the best toasted sandwiches in the Peninsula (her picture taken and posted with permission).

If you live in the South Peninsula of Cape Town, this particular outfit is looking for members to sign up and pay R1000. This isn’t a loan or a donation: it’s an advance payment towards six months of groceries. The details are all here: email them on info@lowimpactliving.co.za to join. I’ve been very impressed by their range of goods in the past, and can’t wait for them to re-open the shop side of the business.

Locals, let’s get those storage jars filled. Write to info@lowimpactliving.co.za to sign up as a member. (This photo, with all other LIL pics, taken and posted with permission.)

Locals, let’s get those storage jars filled. Write to info@lowimpactliving.co.za to sign up as a member. (This photo, with all other LIL pics, taken and posted with permission.)




Helen Moffett
1001 Water- and waste-wise ways: Have yourself a green Valentine's Day
Replace the cut flowers with a living plant. Prickles are not obligatory.

Replace the cut flowers with a living plant. Prickles are not obligatory.

Does the annual commercial mugging by pink hearts aka Valentine’s Day set your teeth on edge? I believe in love, and am a sucker for a truly romantic gesture, but waste-consciousness is yet another reason, if not to abstain, then to adapt your V-day habit. It’s become a sea of red paper, tinsel, yet more pink plastic puffery and mediocre chocs rattling around in way too much packaging.

The other day, I saw a delightful set of Green Valentine’s suggestions in a local high-school letter, and hoped to get permission to reprint them. But what with loadshedding (euphemism for rolling blackouts imposed by a national power supplier so corrupt and incompetent it can’t even keep the lights on), the messages didn’t get through. But the teenage author and I definitely have the same principal idea: DON’T BUY ANYTHING FOR V-DAY. (If you must, then read on for suggestions.)

Let’s start with the traditional items on the list: red roses. Sorry, but no. If you insist on cut flowers, try for something indigenous and local — that hasn’t been whizzed around the country or the globe in a cargo plane. In fact, replace cut flowers with a plant. A colourful pot plant can be just as beautiful as a bouquet, and even nicer is an edible plant, or something cute and quirky, like a water-wise succulent. (Look out for ones in rudely suggestive shapes, if that floats your honey’s boat.)

Next, chocolates and their ilk. Far be it from me to suggest you eschew chocolate, proven to lift the spirits. But have you looked closely at the packaging involved, especially for the kinds where the confections are not only in a box apparently designed by German car manufacturers, but individually wrapped? So what’s to do?

Break out an apron, and get baking. So many possibilities: heart-shaped biscuits, delicious coconut-date-nut balls for your vegan sweetheart, home-made peanut brittle (you can even make your own Nutella — ridiculously easy AND sans palm oil), and a thousand variations on chocolate brownies and muffins. (A friend makes legendary flour-free brownies with butter beans.) What’s especially nice about this kind of V-day gesture is that you’ll be making entire batches, so there’s a lot more love to go around – you can show up at your child’s school, your sewing collective, your workshop, or your book club with cupcakes for your colleagues, kids’ teachers, friends and even your enemies. Of which you will promptly have less.

Make a card, instead of buying one. Look around for a bright postcard to repurpose, or dig around in your craft supplies. Get your children in on the act. Ask them to think of people who might need a cheering word and will appreciate a pretty homemade card.

Yes, a special meal in a restaurant is nice. And it’s completely possible to have a low-impact or even zero-waste evening out (see this reminder of how cafes and restaurants can make a green difference). But consider whipping up something special at home. You and your spice can share the work: one of you can do a starter and pud, the other the main course and salad. Time to liberate all the candles in the house: thanks to &^%$# Eskom (see above), you’ll probably need them anyway.

Spa treatments? How about administering a massage or beauty treatment in the privacy of your own home? Trust me, giving a good back rub or scalp massage is NOT difficult. The ever-reliable Google will tell you how, and once again, You Tube is your friend (if your sensibilities are delicate, don’t click on anything that looks like porn.)

There are simple tricks that leave only delicate footprints on the earth: pour some oil (almond, coconut, olive) into a small dish and then place that in a larger dish of hot water for a minute, so that the oil warms up to blood heat. Add a few drops of fragrance oil or perfume. Apply to the skin of your sweetheart and rub in slow strokes. You’ll be popular. If that sounds too complicated, with potential for spilling or scalding, here’s a foolproof version: invite your dear one to choose a body lotion or cream they like from your bathroom cupboard, then pop it in the microwave for ten seconds. (Test the temperature at this point: it may need another five seconds.) The resulting warm, fragrant lotion is a winner. Warm flannels and hot towels are also good ideas. Just don’t set the house on fire.

But, but, the economy, you say: all those businesses that rely on this kind of “special day” commercial traffic. Doesn’t this green stuff cut them off at the knees?

This is not a day for a lecture on our blindly consumptive economy, so by all means splurge on a spa, or a restaurant meal, or a showy bunch of blooms if you have the means (try to pick a supplier that seems to be doing more than going through the green motions). But take your widowed friend out to dinner, send your elderly aunt the flowers, treat someone battling with physical or mental health issues to the spa pampering. Make it up to your loved one in kisses.

Finally, and this is for all the blokes out there: the single biggest thing you can do to reduce the waste you’ll generate in your lifetime and in perpetuity: have a vasectomy. It’s also the most romantic gesture you can ever make. Giving men the snip is infinitely more sensible than sterilising women (we’re fertile three days a month for thirty years, you’re a potential bunny rabbit every single day from puberty until the grave), as well as safer, cheaper, medically less invasive, etc.

Too much? OK, then try this, the sweetest V-day suggestion to land in my inbox: the option to send your crush a romantic card mentioning a date with a dreamy vet. VET?! OK, we’re trying to be cute here: animal sterilisation charity SA MAST have the loveliest idea of sending Valentine’s cards on your behalf to whoever makes your heart beat faster in exchange for a donation towards spaying or neutering a cat or dog in Khayelitsha. This poster did make my knees a little weak: the pics are for swooning. Here’s the link with all the details you need. Do this, and a whole lot of people and animals will have a genuinely happy Valentine’s Day.

Love4.jpg
Helen Moffett
1001 Water- and waste-wise ways: another lipstick blog
Squeezing out every last drop: Kate Sidley’s bathroom shelf.

Squeezing out every last drop: Kate Sidley’s bathroom shelf.

This might be my most frivolous blog yet, but the topic of waste reduction is so huge, bleak and complex, I thought I’d tackle something bright and fluffy for a change. Plus my water-wise lipstick blog was surprisingly popular.

So let’s talk about waste and beauty routines. Now I have a complicated relationship with such matters. Since I stopped showering/bathing/washing my hair as a matter of daily routine, I have been staggered by the improvement in my overall skin, hair and scalp health. I positively glow.

But few things make me as unpopular as urging similar lifestyle changes on my friends: washing hair only every seven to ten days, showering/bathing once a week, and using the bucket/damp flannel method the rest of the time. It’s the one thing that makes people dig in their toes. “You make me feel defensive,” grumbles a friend. “But I’m appealing to your vanity!”, I cry, pointing to my blooming phiz.

Then I spotted that the internet was in a tizz about newly elected New York representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s skincare routine. A SIX-STEP facial routine? With “double cleansing”? What bizarre ritual had capitalism invented for (mostly) women now? “Self-care!” everyone trumpeted.

This gives me the harumphs, until I realise that it’s all very well for me. I live in one of the most beautiful natural environments in the world, in which I can choose between several beaches, mountain trails, lake boardwalks or nature reserves for my daily destressing walk. Very few middle-class urban dwellers have these options (much less the poor or rural populations), so if patting your face for twenty mins every morning or night is a viable form of self-nurturing, I’m all for it. 

Nevertheless: the truth is that the beauty industry, which has wrapped its tentacles around all genders in the last few decades, is a snake-oil business that flogs mostly utterly needless products for astoundingly presumptuous prices. “Skincare has always been about putting money on your face,” says the Guardian’s Morwenna Ferrier.

My problem right now with this industry is the excessive amount of waste it generates. Think of all those tiny pots, lipstick cases, plastic shampoo containers, earbuds, facial wipes, the fussy “pretty” packaging, and more more more.

So let’s tackle this. First, I urge you to emulate my clever and beautiful writer/journalist friend, Kate Sidley (the photo at the top is hers): go through your bathroom cupboard and make-up box and use up absolutely everything in it before buying anything new. Cut open those weeny little obscenely priced tubes and scrape out the contents. Same with the samples you get in magazines. If elegant local actress Grethe Fox does this, so can you. (She refuses to take any credit: “It’s how we were brought up.”)

Buy biodegradable cottonwool earbuds, bamboo toothbrushes, washable make-up brushes and sponges. I may go a tad too far: reluctant to throw away my remaining regular cotton buds (I bought a jumbo pack years ago and am down to my last three), I strip off the ends to burn, and chuck the remaining plastic sticks into my eco-bricks.

 For decades now, whenever I reach the end of a lipstick (I hold no truck with Forever Young Yeah Right skin goo, but I dearly love make-up), I scrape out the bit left behind into a special pot, add a drop of almond oil, mix, and apply with a lip brush. Because this gets added to regularly, the colour is always changing, and it always suits me. A friend used to create fabulous art with lipstick, so for a while I collected everyone’s lipstick stubs and posted them off to her.

Red Bull, by Sarah Britten, lipstick artist.

Red Bull, by Sarah Britten, lipstick artist.

Another option is to make your own creams to put on your face: one of my favourite green gifts was a lovely pot of moisturizer made from scratch by a friend. Quite a few people are trying this, to reduce waste, save costs, protect animals, and avoid slathering chemicals on their skin. You Tube will drown you in videos showing you how (I picked this one at random because it didn’t start with an ad). Interestingly, friends who’re doing this say the most expensive ingredients are the pure scented oils. There has to be a way around this (eyes the lavender and herbs in the garden). You can make your own cosmetics, too: simply Google. This was the first link I found (another rabbit warren to explore! Check out the links to the Paris To Go Zero Waste blog, but set aside several hours — some fascinating stuff there.)

Hotels and guesthouses are already addressing the problem of the sea of little plastic shampoo, conditioner and shower gel bottles. (I once collected every single one I got on a poetry tour halfway round the world, and practically needed a second suitcase.) Trouble is, when they replace them with big bottles to be re-used by multiple guests, they have to bolt them to the shower walls to stop folk swanning off with them. Still, that’s the way to go, and in the meantime, donate those miniature bottles and soaps to organisations like Rape Crisis, who put them in comfort packages to give to children who’ve suffered unspeakable violation.

After three weeks of modest motels in Western Canada, I had already amassed these…

After three weeks of modest motels in Western Canada, I had already amassed these…


I leave you with this final thought: Julia Roberts was recently asked for her single most NB beauty tip. Hold onto your hats, here it comes, from one of the most iconic and bankable faces in the world: LOOK AFTER YOUR TEETH. There you have it. What’s more, she doesn’t use toothpaste. She brushes with bicarb. Be like Julia.

 

 

 

 

Helen Moffett